P-Value Problems: Crash Course Statistics #22

From Crash Course. Last week we introduced p-values as a way to set a predetermined cutoff when testing if something seems unusual enough to reject our null hypothesis – that they are the same. But today we’re going to discuss some problems with the logic of p-values, how they are commonly misinterpreted, how p-values don’t…

The New Astronomy: Crash Course History of Science #13

From Crash Course. This week on Crash Course: History of the Scientific Revolution—astronomical anomalies accrued. Meanwhile, in Denmark—an eccentric rich dude constructed not one but two science castles! And his humble German assistant synthesized a lot of new, old, and bold astronomical ideas into a single sun-centered, eccentricity-positive system… *** Crash Course is on Patreon!…

Reversibility & Irreversibility: Crash Course Engineering #8

From Crash Course. How do we design the most efficient machines and processes? Today we’ll try to figure that out as we discuss heat & work, reversibility & irreversibility, and how to use efficiency to measure a system. Crash Course Engineering is produced in association with PBS Digital Studios: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1mtdjDVOoOqJzeaJAV15Tq0tZ1vKj7ZV *** RESOURCES: http://leadfootengineering.com/pistons-101 http://www.dictionary.com/browse/piston Internal…

The Spanish Golden Age: Crash Course Theater #19

From Crash Course. This week on Crash Course Theater, Mike and Yorick take us to beautiful Spain, and look at its Golden Age. Spain was having kind of a moment in the 16th and 17th centuries. They had this big empire, the culture was really flowering, and Humanism was popping up all over, but they…

Crash Course Engineering #7: The Law of Conservation

From Crash Course. Today Shini explains the law of conservation, beginning with simple, steady-state systems. We’ll discuss conversion and yield, accumulation, and how generation and consumption can affect how much accumulation there is in a system. This episode is sponsored by CuriosityStream: http://curiositystream.com/crashcourse Crash Course Engineering is produced in association with PBS Digital Studios: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1mtdjDVOoOqJzeaJAV15Tq0tZ1vKj7ZV…

Cathedrals and Universities: Crash Course History of Science #11

From Crash Course. Until roughly 1100, there were relatively few places of knowledge-making. Monasteries and abbeys had special rooms called scriptoria where monks copied manuscripts by hand. But the biggest places where knowledge was made were the Gothic cathedrals. Then Universities came along, too. This is the story of those two institutions! *** Crash Course…

Biomedical & Industrial Engineering: Crash Course Engineering #6

From Crash Course. We’ve discussed the four main branches of engineering but there are so many other fields doing important work, so today we’re going to explore a few of them. In this episode we’ll explore some of the history and fundamentals of industrial engineering, biomedical engineering, and bioengineering. Crash Course Engineering is produced in…

Where Did Theater Go? Crash Course Theater #18

From Crash Course. EPISODE DESCRIPTION The English Theater survived a lot of pushback from various powers that be, but in the 17th century, it had to go into hiding, from PURITANS. Let’s take a look at how the English Civil War, Charles I’s beheading, and the Restoration of the monarchy all had effects on the…

The History of Chemical Engineering: Crash Course Engineering #5

From Crash Course. Today we’ll cover the fourth and final of our core disciplines of engineering: chemical engineering. We’ll talk about its history and evolution going from soda ash competitions to oil refineries and renewable energies. We’ll also discuss some newer and emerging fields like biotechnology and pharmaceuticals. NOTE: This is a re-upload to correct…

Chemical Engineering: Crash Course Engineering #5

From Crash Course. Today we’ll cover the fourth and final of our core disciplines of engineering: chemical engineering. We’ll talk about its history and evolution going from soda ash competitions to oil refineries and renewable energies. We’ll also discuss some newer and emerging fields like biotechnology and pharmaceuticals. Crash Course Engineering is produced in association…

Confidence Intervals: Crash Course Statistics #20

From Crash Course. Today we’re going to talk about confidence intervals. Confidence intervals allow us to quantify our uncertainty, by allowing us to define a range of values for our predictions and assigning a likelihood that something falls within that range. And confidence intervals come up a lot like when you get delivery windows for…

Alchemy: History of Science #10

From Crash Course. In fantasy stories, charlatans in fancy robes promise to turn lead into gold. But real alchemists weren’t just mystical misers. They were skilled experimentalists, backed by theories of matter. And they played a huge role in the development of knowledge about one of our fundamental questions: “what is stuff?” *** Crash Course…

English Theater After Shakespeare: Crash Course Theater #17

From Crash Course. You can learn more about CuriosityStream at https://curiositystream.com/crashcourse This week on Crash Course Theater, Shakespeare is dead. Long live Shakespeare. Well, long live English theater, anyway. Actually, it’s about to get banned. Anyway, we’re discussing where English theater went post-1616. We’ll talk about Ben Jonson, revenge tragedies, and court masques. Crash Course…

The History of Electrical Engineering: Crash Course Engineering #4

From Crash Course. Next stop on our tour of engineering’s major fields: electrical engineering. In this episode we’ll explore the history of telecommunications, electric power and lighting, and computers. We’ll introduce topics like magnetism, electrical conduction, telegraphy, lighting, and computers. Crash Course Engineering is produced in association with PBS Digital Studios: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1mtdjDVOoOqJzeaJAV15Tq0tZ1vKj7ZV *** RESOURCES: https://www.britannica.com/biography/William-Gilbert…

The Normal Distribution: Crash Course Statistics #19

From Crash Course. Today is the day we finally talk about the normal distribution! The normal distribution is incredibly important in statistics because distributions of means are normally distributed even if populations aren’t. We’ll get into why this is so – due to the Central Limit Theorem – but it’s useful because it allows us…

Mechanical Engineering: Crash Course Engineering #3

From Crash Course. Today we continue our tour through the major fields of engineering with a look at mechanical engineering, beginning with the steam engine. We’ll discuss aircraft, the development of aerospace engineering, and take a look into the future of robotics and biomechanics. Crash Course Engineering is produced in association with PBS Digital Studios:…

Civil Engineering: Crash Course Engineering #2

From Crash Course. We’re beginning our engineering journey with a tour through the major branches. Today Shini explains the facets of civil engineering, including structural and construction engineering, city planning, transportation, and sanitation. Crash Course Engineering is produced in association with PBS Digital Studios: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1mtdjDVOoOqJzeaJAV15Tq0tZ1vKj7ZV *** RESOURCES: https://www.engineering.com/DesignerEdge/DesignerEdgeArticles/ArticleID/14451/Who-was-the-First-Engineer.aspx https://www.britannica.com/biography/Imhotep https://www.livescience.com/23050-step-pyramid-djoser.html http://www.thecivilengg.com/History.php https://www.britannica.com/technology/aqueduct-engineering https://www.peabody.harvard.edu/node/2151 http://www.museumofthecity.org/project/hippodamus-and-early-planned-cities/ http://classics.mit.edu/Aristotle/politics.2.two.html…

Randomness: Crash Course Statistics #17

From Crash Course. There are a lot of events in life that we just can’t predict, but just because something is random doesn’t mean we don’t know or can’t learn anything about it. Today, we’re going to talk about how we can extract information from seemingly random events starting with the expected value or mean…

Medieval China: Crash Course History of Science #8

From Crash Course. Like Egypt, Sumer, and Mesoamerica, ancient China represents a hydraulic civilization—one that maintained its population by diverting rivers to aid in irrigation—and one that developed writing thousands of years ago. Today, we’re going to focus on the time of the Northern and Southern Song Dynasties, a time of great technical innovation. But,…

What is Engineering?: Crash Course Engineering #1

From Crash Course. In our first episode of Crash Course Engineering, Shini explains what engineering is, and gives a brief overview of its four main branches (civil, mechanical, electrical, and chemical) as well as a look at some of the other fields of engineering. Crash Course Engineering is produced in association with PBS Digital Studios:…

Future Literacies: Crash Course Media Literacy #12

From Crash Course. We’ve seen and discussed the ways in which the rapid pace of technological change has affected the media literacy landscape, and it’s clear that change isn’t slowing down. How will those changes affect the future of media literacy? How can we make the skills we’ve discussed over this course transferable to future…

The Medieval Islamicate World: Crash Course History of Science #7

From Crash Course. The religion of Islam significantly influenced knowledge-making in the greater Mediterranean and western Asian world. Islamicate scholars—meaning people influenced by Islamic civilization, regardless of their religious views—gave us terms such as “algebra,” “azimuth,” “algorithm,” “alcohol,” “alkali,” and “alembic.” We’ll dive into Islamic medicine and philosophers such as the great Persian polymath Ibn…

The English Renaissance and NOT Shakespeare

From Crash Course. The Renaissance came to England late, thanks to a Hundred Years War that ran long and lasted 116 years, and then a civil war to decide who would be the royal family. BUT after all that, with the Tudors (relatively) securely installed on the throne, there was a flowering of humanism, science,…