A whale song class at a British museum

From Quartz. Whale watcher and artist Marina Rees teaches whale sounds singing classes as part of a special exhibition at the Old Low Light Heritage Center in North Shields, England. While many whales make sounds, male humpbacks are known for their song, which they produce by repeating long, complex patterns of sounds, sometimes for days…

Hollywood tech helps tennis players improve their skills

From Quartz. Elite Wimbledon players like Serena Williams or Roger Federer may get help from Hollywood the next time they hit the tennis court. New motion capture technology, similar to the kind used in Hollywood movies, could help tennis players improve technique and avoid injury. Scientists at Coventry University developed a system that uses motion…

Christo’s latest art project is made of 7,506 oil barrels

From Quartz. For almost 50 years, the artist duo and couple Christo and Jeanne-Claude have collaborated on temporary, grand-scale art installations all over the world. Christo just unveiled their latest project, The London Mastaba, a floating sculpture made of 7,506 oil barrels in the middle of The Serpentine lake in Hyde Park. Though Jeanne-Claude passed…

A 20 cent tool could save lives and transform health care

From Quartz. Scientists at Princeton University invented a low-cost medical device that could save lives and revolutionize health care. The paperfuge is centrifuge made of paper, string, and plastic that can separate blood cells with no electricity. And it only costs 20 cents. Researchers were inspired by whirligig toys and believe invention will help in…

The world’s most ambitious parenting program

From Quartz. Criança Feliz (Happy Child) is an ambitious new parent coaching program in Brazil. It teaches parents the importance of early childhood learning and development with the goal of fighting inequality. If it works, it might lift millions in Latin America’s largest country out of poverty. The focus? Its youngest citizens: children between the…

Why TV shows have better gay characters than movies

From Quartz. Have you ever noticed that TV shows tend to feature more gay and lesbian characters than movies? Of the 109 films released by major Hollywood studios last year, just 14 had LGBTQ characters. And half of those characters got less than five minutes of screen time. When gay characters do appear in movies,…

A robot uses live rat muscle tissue to mimic human fingers

From Quartz. Researchers in Japan grew living tissue from rat muscle cells to create a new kind of robotic hand that mimics human movements. Scientists at the University of Tokyo attached the lab-grown muscle tissue to a 3D-printed bone-like structure to create functional “biohybrid” robotic fingers. The robots can mimic the movements of human fingers…

Lauren Duca wants to change how women talk about politics

From Quartz. Lauren Duca is a political journalist and writer for Teen Vogue, where she publishes a weekly column, Thigh-High Politics. Duca’s op-ed “Donald Trump is Gaslighting America” went viral during the 2016 election, which lead to an interview with Tucker Carlson on Fox News that quickly devolved into shouting and name-calling. Duca not only…

The future of flying is robot pilots

From Quartz. In the future, you could fly a plane piloted by robots. The US military invented a robot arm that can fly commercial airplanes using AI. The robot pilot was developed by engineers at DARPA, the Pentagon’s research unit. Last year, the robot flew and landed a simulated 737 and has successfully flown an…

Eating food covered in gold

From Quartz. From chicken wings to chocolate, gold food is becoming a new food trend. Edible gold foods are covered in 24k gold leaf, which is safe to eat but can’t be broken down by your body. In Japan, Gold Kit Kat bars have gotten the Midas touch, and sushi chefs are adding gold topping…

Businesses cash in on the Trump Kim summit

From Quartz. After the Trump-Kim summit in Singapore, local businesses are capitalizing on the historic diplomatic talks between North Korea and the United States. Donald Trump was the first American president to meet with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, and local restaurants and businesses have been inspired to create special Trump-Kim themed items to…

Rachel Bloom: Why Crazy Ex-Girlfriend challenges romantic comedy

From Quartz. Rachel Bloom is the star, writer, and co-creator of Crazy Ex-Girlfriend on The CW, a TV show that plays on the idea of love and romantic obsession through musical comedy. Prior to creating Crazy Ex-Girlfriend, Bloom made hilarious music videos on Youtube like “F*ck Me, Ray Bradbury” and “I Steal Pets.” Bloom uses…

French artist spends a week in a lion man statue

From Quartz. French performance artist Abraham Poincheval spent a week inside a giant wooden lion man statue. Poincheval says his solo art performances explore how the concept of time and space differs for humans, animals, and objects. It’s one of his many performances where he likes to stay in enclosed spaces. Poincheval’s previous art projects…

This robot can fly in a cave by itself

From Quartz. A new flying robot AI system developed by Exyn Technologies can map dark, dangerous places like caves and old mines. The drones map caves autonomously using LIDAR technology (radar that uses light from a laser) and recreate the world around them in a 3D image. The flying robots will help improve safety for…

Inside Japan’s Olympic condom factory

From Quartz. Sagami Rubber Industries, a Japanese condom company, is ramping up production of the world’s thinnest condom just in time for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. Condoms are typically distributed in at the Olympics to promote safe sex. Japan’s pleasure industry is expecting an influx of travelers for the Games, where hundreds of thousands of…

Randi Zuckerberg on being a woman in Silicon Valley

From Quartz. One of the first executives at Facebook, Randi Zuckerberg knows first-hand the difficulty working as a woman in tech in Silicon Valley. Randi’s the sister of Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, but a successful entrepreneur in her own right: she created Facebook Live, founded a media company, authored four books, hosts a radio show,…

The age when dogs are cutest, according to science

From Quartz. Dogs reach peak cuteness at about eight weeks old, according to a new study. The age when humans find puppies most adorable could hint at how dogs evolved as pets alongside us. Scientists researching the relationship between humans and dogs had college students rate puppies based on how attractive they were. The researchers…

Playing piano with a mind-controlled robotic arm

From Quartz. The first person to live with a mind-controlled robotic arm is teaching himself piano. Johnny Matheny has spent the last five months with an advanced prosthetic, designed to replace the human hand and arm. The robot arm is part of a research project run through the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Lab, and…

French nudists visited a Paris museum

From Quartz. 160 French nudists recently descended on the Palais de Tokyo, a contemporary art museum in Paris. The visit was coordinated by the Paris Naturists Association, which periodically meets to do water aerobics, yoga, and dinner. Naked. The group is actually one of many in France, the world’s top nudist destination at over 1.5…

Linda Sarsour is a Muslim American on a mission

From Quartz. Linda Sarsour is a Muslim American, community organizer, and mother of three. The Palestinian activist (and co-chair of the Women’s March) shatters stereotypes about what it means to be a Muslim woman in America. Born and raised in Brooklyn, she was inspired to become a civil rights activist after 9/11. In an interview…

John Lewis: “We have to save our democratic ideas”

From Quartz. In a graduation speech, Rep. John Lewis told students to remember Martin Luther King Jr., Gandhi, and Jesus taught the way of love. John Lewis spoke at Boston University’s commencement on Sunday, encouraging graduates to speak up when they see something that’s not right or just, and to never give up on their…

Chelsea Clinton: Empower women and girls to be brave

From Quartz. Chelsea Clinton understands better than most how women around the world can face extra scrutiny. The challenge, she says, is responding with resilience and bravery. Clinton sat down with Quartz to talk about empowering future generations, the “imagination gap” young girls face, and how sexism is not an opinion. Read more from How…

An incredible 3D map of a mouse retina

From Quartz. Researchers created an amazing 3D map of a retina with imaging from the back of a mouse’s eye. Scientists crowdsourced the eye map with the help of online gamers. The resulting “museum” shows the features that process visuals are more complex than we’ve ever realized, even in animals with relatively simple eyes. By…

Justin Trudeau redefined courage in a speech to college grads

From Quartz. In a speech to college graduates yesterday, Canadian prime minister Justin Trudeau gave students a new definition of bravery. Trudeau’s speech was an ode to openness and tolerance in an age of “polarization and identity politics.” He told NYU students that real courage in leadership isn’t defending your beliefs, but being willing to…

This ride changes speed based on your heart rate

From Quartz. This ride gets faster or slower depending on how scared you are, adjusting speed based on a rider’s heart rate. Last year, Dutch designer Daniel de Bruin created a one-person ride called the Neurotransmitter 3000 that speeds up or slows down based on biometric data it gathers from the rider’s body. The rider…

Aparna Nancherla: How depression led to stand-up comedy

From Quartz. Aparna Nancherla’s stand-up comedy crushes mental health stigmas by facing them head on. Nancherla is depressed, anxious, shy, and one of the funniest women working in comedy. She recently released a stand-up special on Netflix and is a regular on Comedy Central’s Corporate. In an interview with Quartz, Nancherla spoke about how depression…

Scientists trained a spider to jump between platforms

From Quartz. A jumping spider might help scientists build flying robots in the future. Researchers at the University of Manchester trained Kim, a regal jumping spider, to jump different distances and heights and found she adjusted her strategy accordingly. Scientists took a 3D scan of Kim and hope to replicate her anatomy and body movements…

A drone that catches whale snot, for science

From Quartz. A drone that collects whale snot may help scientists better understand ocean life. The Parley SnotBot flies over whales in ocean water to catch their snot, allowing scientists to analyze DNA, viruses, and environmental toxins in their bodies. Ocean Alliance developed the drone with Olin College of Engineering to make it easier to…

The Philippines is phasing out its iconic jeepneys

From Quartz. Not quite a car, but not quite a bus, jeepneys are the most popular means of public transportation in the Philippines. Called “Kings of the Road,” the colorful buses are a major contributor to pollution, so the Filipino government launched a plan in January to replace the jeepneys with newer models. But drivers…

How light pollution affects stars in the night sky

From Quartz. At night, artificial light can block our view of the stars. Night light pollution levels determine how well stars can be seen, and are based on a scientific scale that measures the brightness of the night sky. Photographer Sriram Murali filmed timelapse videos of the Orion constellation from eight different locations to show…